By | 23.02.2019

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Norwegian Christmas Traditions - Cornelia

Welcome to our guide to Norway. This is useful for anyone researching Norwegian culture, customs, manners, etiquette, values and wanting to understand the people better. You may be going to Norway on business, for a visit or even hosting Norwegian colleagues or clients in your own country. Remember this is only a very basic level introduction and is not meant to stereotype all Norwegians you may meet! Northern Europe, bordering Finland km, Sweden 1, km, Russia km. Norwegian has 2 written forms, "Bokmal" Book Norwegian and "Nynorsk" New Norwegian and they enjoy the same legal recognition, although "Bokmal" is increasingly more common. Minority languages include Finnish, spoken by 0.

The Norwegian ďArtĒ of Seduction

A houseplant is well received in the winter months. A bouquet of freshly picked wildflowers is always appreciated. Gifts are opened when received. Dining Etiquette Invitations are generally given verbally. Norwegians are punctual in both business and social situations. Confirm the dress code with your hosts. Offer to help the hostess with the preparation or clearing up after a meal is served.

Do not discuss business. Norwegians separate their business and personal lives. Table manners are more formal than one might expect of a culture that is informal and egalitarian.

Hold the fork in the left hand and the knife in the right while eating. Do not begin eating until the hostess starts. Most food, including sandwiches, is eaten with utensils. When you have finished eating, place your knife and fork across your plate with the prongs facing down and the handles facing to the right.

The male guest of honour, generally seated to the left of the hostess, thanks the hostess on behalf of the other guests with the phrase "takk for maten" thanks for the meal.

The Norwegian Dating Culture

The host makes a small speech and offers the first toast. Women may offer toasts. Toasts are made with alcoholic beverages, but not beer. When someone is being toasted, raise your glass, look at the person, take a sip, look at the person again, and then return the glass to the table.

Norwegian dating traditions

Women must put down their glasses first after a toast. Nonetheless, they prefer to do business with those they trust, so it is important that you provide information about yourself and the company you represent prior to meeting your business colleagues.

Relationships develop slowly and depend upon the other person being professional and meeting all agreed upon deadlines. Giving a well-researched presentation indicates that you are serious about conducting business. The basic business style is relatively informal. Norwegians respect confident, self-assured businesspeople. They are excellent time managers who do not require face-to-face contact in order to conduct business. If you are like-minded, the relationship will develop over time.

Appearing overly friendly at the start of a relationship may be viewed as weakness. Maintaining eye contact while speaking is interpreted as sincerity. Norwegians are direct communicators. They have no difficulty telling their colleagues that they disagree with something that has been said. Their communication is straightforward and relies on facts.

They are conservative and deliberate speakers who do not appreciate being rushed. They are scrupulous about honesty in communication, often to the point of pointing out the negatives in their own proposals in greater detail than the positives. Norwegians are not emotive speakers and their body language is subtle. Business Meeting Etiquette Appointments are necessary and should be made as far in advance as possible. Appointments may be made in writing or by telephone. If writing, address the letter to the head of the division, even if you do not know the person.

Punctuality is imperative since it indicates trustworthiness. If you are delayed even 5 minutes, it is polite to telephone and explain the situation. Arriving late without prior notice can damage a potential relationship. It is often difficult to schedule meetings during July and August, which are popular vacation times; during the two weeks before and after Christmas; and during the week before and after Easter.

Meetings are rather informal. Send an agenda before the meeting so that your Norwegian colleagues can be prepared. There is not much small talk. Norwegians prefer to get to the business discussion quickly. Presentations should be precise and concrete, and backed up with charts, figures and analysis.

Avoid hype or exaggerated claims in your presentation. Norwegians do not interrupt and will save their questions until you have finished speaking.

DATING CULTURE IN NORWAY & WHAT NORWEGIAN MEN/WOMEN ARE LIKE - snowintromso

Negotiating Decisions are consensus driven. Expect decisions to take time as your colleagues must weigh all the alternatives. Present a firm, realistic, and competitive initial price and expect a minimum of bargaining. Price is often the most important deciding factor.

Norwegians do not generally give discounts, even to good customers or for large orders.

Norwegians are detail oriented. Maintain eye contact while speaking. This attitude towards marriage begins with relationships in Norway. Many young people want to establish themselves as individuals prior to marrying, which means dating is generally drawn out over time as individuals place education, careers, exploration, and owning a home as higher priorities than marriage.

Most Norwegians date much as they do in other European and North American countries, but rarely does a relationship become serious until the couple is in their mids if not older. Despite the delay in marriage, many Norwegians find themselves in committed relationships through the dating process, which often leads to living together and even having children most first born children in Norway are born out of wed-lock.

These things, much like gaining an education and starting a career, are often viewed as more important than marriage itself. A part of this is because many people view marriage as simply a legal standing, plus few people put great weight in religious reasons that encourage marriage.

Despite the delay, and at times lack of belief in marriage, people in Norway still marry in significant numbers. Both heterosexual marriages and same-sex marriages are legal in Norway and many people do marry, although that might not occur until a couple is in their 30s or even later. Your Guide to Norway: When, and if, couples decide to marry, they do so for a number of reasons. Many simply decide it's the right time to marry, while others marry for legal reasons, or to have a large party.

In fact the party is the one consistent in large Norwegian weddings as these generally go well into the next morning. Of course with these weddings, expenses can quickly add up so some people chose to have a small civil ceremony instead.

For couples with children, it is common for their kids to participate in the wedding as it's truly a family affair. Family life in Norway follows much of the same lines as dating and marriage.

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